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What is an Asset of Community Value?

An asset of community value can comprise of land or buildings

Definition of an Asset of Community Value

When we assess whether a particular building or piece of land is of community value, we must determine whether it meets the definition of an asset of community value as set out in Section 88 of the Localism Act 2011.

A building or piece of land in Craven district is deemed to be of community value if:

  • The current main use of the building or land furthers the social interests or social wellbeing of the local community or a use in the recent past has done so and, it is realistic to think that there can continue to be a main use of the building or land which will further the social interests or social well-being of the local community, whether or not in the same way as before.
  • The main use of the land or building in the recent past furthered the social interests of the local community and , it is realistic within five years the land or building can be brought back into a use that furthers the social interest or wellbeing of the local community, whether or not in the same way as before.

Alternatively, an asset can qualify if it had such a use in the recent past, and it is realistic to think that there is a time in the next five years when it could do so again (whether or not in the same way as before).

Please note: "Use" means the main use of the land or building. For these purposes, an ancillary (or secondary) use does not count.

Examples of assets of community value could be pubs, shops, libraries and community facilities, although not every example of these facilities will qualify. For example a shop in Skipton High Street would not be considered to further the community's social well being or interests in the same way as a single shop in a small village

Examples of potential community assets

The interpretation of the definition of a community asset creates a very wide range of possible assets to be considered as suitable for nomination. It is proposed to use the following categories as part of the nomination process

  • Education, health and well- being and community safety to include, nurseries, schools, children's centres, health centres, day care centres or care homes, community centres, youth centres or public toilets.
  • Sport, recreation and culture to include: parks and public open spaces, sports and leisure centres, libraries, swimming pools and theatres
  • Economic use providing an important local social benefit which would no longer be available if that use stopped - to include village shops and pubs.