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Social housing standards

On 1 April 2012 the Tenant Services Authority (TSA) was abolished and the Homes & Communities Agency took over as the regulator of social housing.

The Homes & Communities Agency's role is to:  

  • protect public investment in social housing
  • maintain confidence of private investors to invest into the sector
  • ensure that social housing continues to be available to current and future tenants
  • enable landlords to be able to invest in new social housing, assuming other conditions are in place
  • are open and transparent, to allow tenants and other stakeholders to form views on and influence the services delivered by providers
  • enable providers to meet the regulatory standards and statutory requirements
  • deliver value for money improvements to support providers to deliver their social housing objectives
  • protect the reputation of the sector as a whole

Register of Social Housing Providers

The HCA hold a register for qualifying social housing providers which is updated and published annually. You can find the current registered social housing providers can be found here.

The new Regulatory Framework

The Regulatory Framework document contains the role and responsibilities of the HCA in relation to it's regulatory powers to ensure that social housing providers meet the required standards.

These standards are split into two categories with sub categories as detailed below:

1. Consumer Standards

  • tenant involvement and empowerment
  • home - standards about the quality of housing, repairs and maintenance
  • tenancy - rules about tenancy and housing allocation
  • neighbourhood and community

2. Economic Standards

  • governance and financial viability standard
  • value for money standard
  • rent standard

To find out more about how the Homes and Communities Agency seeks to improve the rented housing sector, please visit their web pages on

Please note that the Homes and Communities Agency's role is limited by law to setting the standards and will only intervene where there the failure to meet the standards has caused, or could have caused, serious harm to tenants. This is known as the serious detriment test.  For all other complaints or comments relating to social housing providers, please contact the individual landlord concerned.