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Craven District Council

Gallow Syke Flood Water Management Scheme

This webpage provides information on a scheme to improve water management along a watercourse known as Gallow Syke in Skipton.

Introduction

This webpage provides information on a scheme implemented to improve water management along Gallow Syke; a small stream that runs through Aireville Park to the west of Skipton town centre.

The works delivered on Gallow Syke are part of a wider scheme that will contribute to improving vehicular access for the Engine Shed Lane and Ings Lane industrial estate – further information on this scheme can be found on the Engine Shed Lane and Ings Lane Highway Improvement Scheme by clicking onto Engine Shed Lane and Ings Lane Highway Improvement Scheme

Location of Gallow Syke

Gallow Syke is a small river and tributary of the River Aire, located to the west of Skipton town centre. Principally in an open channel passing through areas of woodland and grassland Gallow Syke flows in a southerly direction from north of Gargrave Road, near Aireville Grange, through Aireville Park to the west of Craven Leisure (swimming pool).

The river then culverts under the Canal and areas of residential and industrial land before joining with Ings Beck at the junction of Broughton Road and Ings Lane. To the west of the A629 Skipton bypass Ings Beck joins the River Aire.

A Location Plan of Gallow Syke can be viewed here – Gallow Syke Location Plan

Background

Whilst flowing through Aireville Park Gallow Syke passes through two main culverts, the first under the access road serving Aireville Park and the second where the Syke exits the park under the Leeds Liverpool Canal.

Prior to this work the inlet to both culverts were in poor condition with inadequate trash screens which regularly became obstructed with debris and, through being redesigned had potential to better support management of water downstream.

What work has been carried out?

At both locations the inlets to the culverts have been rebuilt with new trash screens, safer walkways for maintenance and materials to help the structure blend with the semi-rural surroundings. In addition, the inlet to the culvert has been physically restricted in size. In normal flows this restriction will have no impact on the watercourse. At higher flows and, during periods of high rainfall, this restriction will manage the volume of water entering the culvert and will store water behind the inlet and restrict the volume of water flowing downstream. Over time this water will then drain away through a controlled approach helping to reduce the volume of water flowing into Ings Beck.

Above the normal culvert inlet, at a higher level, and only forecast to be used during extreme rainfall events, a high-level grate has been incorporated that acts as an overflow should the stored water reach this level. This grate then directs water directly into the existing culvert bypassing the restriction.

Culvert Inlets - Before and After

Aireville Park Access Road

This culvert is located under the access road serving Aireville Park and Craven Leisure. As shown below the existing culvert trash screen has been replaced. In addition, works at this location included:

  • Reprofiling of the existing embankment to allow construction of the new culvert headwall
  • Restricting flow through the new culvert headwall to temporarily store water
  • New fencing to restrict access to the culvert and culvert headwall
  • Improved access for maintenance

Looking downstream showing the previous culvert inlet

Looking downstream

Looking downstream showing the new trash screen and culvert inlet

Gallow Syke

Looking upstream showing the original culvert inlet and Gallow Syke

upstream from top of banking by Aireville Park access road

Looking upstream showing the new high level overflow and down to the lower trash screen

Gallow Syke

Photo Credit: Chapman Brown Photography


Adjacent to the Leeds and Liverpool Canal

This culvert is located adjacent to the Leeds Liverpool Canal in an area of woodland to the rear of Craven Leisure. Informal water storage has already taken place in this area due to the topography of the area, the Canal embankment, and the original culvert trash screen. Works at this location included:

 Reprofiling and strengthening of a 65m section of Canal embankment,

  • Restricting flow through the new culvert headwall to temporarily store water
  • Maintaining access along the existing public right of way
  • Planting of over 700 trees and understorey shrubs surrounding Gallow Syke
  • Reseeding the Canal embankment with a species rich wildflower grass mix
  • Improving access for maintenance and clearance of debris

Looking downstream showing the previous culvert inlet

Gallow Syke

Looking downstream showing the new, strengthened embankment and culvert inlet 

Canal Culvert after

Looking upstream showing the previous culvert inlet

Gallow Syke

Looking upstream showing the embankment and tree planting

Gallow Syke

What other works were delivered?

To implement the works some tree removal took place from both areas around the culvert entrances. This allowed the new structures to be built and provided access to the sites. Following the tree work and construction of the new structures the District Council has undertaken further tree and shrub planting that will also help reduce areas of bare ground and silt being washed downstream.

What downstream benefit will this work provide to Engine Shed Lane and Ings Lane? 

The Flood Risk Assessment produced for the works shows, whilst not increasing flood risk to surrounding premises the work provides notable reduction of flood flows downstream running under the railway bridge at Ings Lane and along Ings Lane itself.

Who designed and constructed the scheme?

The modelling of how water flows along Gallow Syke, the design and impact of the new culvert inlets was undertaken by WSP UK Ltd., the District Council’s Principal Designer and Contract Manager.

In addition, the District Council procured their Principal Contractor, Galliford Try who, along with their subcontractors, were responsible for constructing the scheme.

Who will maintain the works?

As the landowner of Aireville Park, including where the culvert inlets are located the District Council will continue to maintain the trash screen infrastructure.

How were the works funded?

The District Council secured a Government ‘Local Growth Fund’ grant via the York & North Yorkshire Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) to deliver the scheme. The work in this project forms part of the wider ‘Employment and Housing Growth in Skipton’ project.

LEP logoNorthern Powerhouse